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June 17, 2011
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HP
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HP ojj4500
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Jun 16, 2011, 2:45:37 PM
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115 Cherry Bark Lane by Built4ever 115 Cherry Bark Lane by Built4ever
I did additional design work on this including designing the front and the pier system, interior trim details (some not shown), landscape design (not shown,) and consultation. I also did the perspective ( by hand, no computer model.) This is a "spec house" and it IS for sale in South Carolina. I did not design the floor plans. It will be very energy-efficient with very low heat bills.
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:iconreadyplayerzero:
readyplayerzero Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2012  Hobbyist Artist
You must have the most satisfying job ever. XD Being able to create something from your imagination and watch it come to life and become somebody's home... ♥
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2012
Even better when they live in it for a few years...
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:iconqanibalito:
Qanibalito Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2012   Interface Designer
I like the way you create something interesant using regular geometric shapes such as triangles and rectangles. The roofs look good
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012
It's all about proportions! Yes!
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:iconpandawish:
pandawish Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2011
Super cool. :)
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2011
It's almost done now, I should post final pics...
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:iconpandawish:
pandawish Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2011
You should! :D
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:iconcoragus:
coragus Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2011
do you like the tudorbethan style?
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2011
Elizabethan and Tudor? he he
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:iconcoragus:
coragus Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2011
isnt that the style name?
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jul 12, 2011
Well, I make up my own style names. I haven't used tudorbethan yet...
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:iconcoragus:
coragus Featured By Owner Jul 12, 2011
hmm odd allot of your work looks tudorbethan
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:iconnormandy24:
normandy24 Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2011
STIIIIIIILLL!!!!!!!!!!!!!! got talent !!!!!!! :D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2011
You should see it now. All the trim up front is going up. It should look like the front elevation soon he he thanks!!
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:iconnormandy24:
normandy24 Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2011
is it me or dose it look differrent from the drawlings ?
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2011
There will be minor differences in the end. The half-timbering pattern is a little different. The size of the slats in the vents in the gable is a little smaller, etc...
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:iconnormandy24:
normandy24 Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2011
oh cool :D !!!
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:iconlittlej313:
littlej313 Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2011
Its really nice that you put pictures of the project in there!
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jun 23, 2011
There should be more later in the summer for this house and others I'm working on, so keep watching...
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:icondaretowatch:
DareToWatch Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2011  Student General Artist
This is great!!!!
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jun 23, 2011
Thanks!
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:icondrugtito:
drugTito Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2011
Interesting......so you guys do the framing on-site?
Folks and companies here who deal with such construction usually prefab entire panels and deliver them and assemble as such.

To tell you the truth, that's relatively new stuff 'round here, masonry and concrete are preferred methods in general opinion and minds of folks.....this kind of construction is usually the chosen option of people who have limited funds. Needless to say, demand for these over brick/concrete houses is increasing every day. In fact, it's been a LONG time since I worked on a house which is not wooden-frame :D

...but I can't say I'm a fan :hmm:
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jun 23, 2011
Yeah, they do these with pre-fab panels too. I'm a little scared of how they "glue" them together, like a model airplane or something. My parents house has the pre-fab walls. Masonry for houses doesn't exist here except very rare ICF (Insulated concrete forms) or even more rare AAC (Aerated autoclaved concrete.) Some coastal construction, especially south Florida, uses block (CMU, concrete masonry unit.)
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:icondrugtito:
drugTito Featured By Owner Jun 26, 2011
Really? Wow, most interesting!

As soon as you mention a word "house" here, 99% of people here will think of clay blocks (y'know, the ones with vertical holes'n'stuff) with concrete for reinforcements on wall edges, corners and points of increased stress, as well as for floor slabs.
...and, as much as it may be 'old-fashioned', I must say I'm a big fan of such construction when smaller-scale housing is concerned....brick as a material is totally natural and can't 100% hermetically seal the building regarding air- and moisture - permeability like concrete, really makes the whole building "breathe"... :)
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jun 27, 2011
We call them clay tiles, and a few houses were built with them here about 80 to 100 years ago, often Tudor and Medit. styles. They are brittle and fail easily in an earthquake, but are also fire resisitant, rot and termite proof, and soundproof. Poor insulators too, not good here. I saw them a lot in Spain when I visited. My builder wants to seal the house off completely! I think we create new problems. High energy efficiency yes, but poor indoor air quality, for example. Running "services" thru wood stud walls is very easy, so electricians, plumbers, and heating and cooling guys prefer wood frame over any kind of block. Is it a challenge to run pipes and wires thru clay blocks? Do you attach rigid foam insulation to inside or outside?
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:icondrugtito:
drugTito Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2011
Yup, clay blocks have massive load-bearing capability, but are (as all masonry) quite pitiful when exposed to anything but vertical forces - horizontal forces/stress such as earthquake or a powerful impact is masonry's terribly weak spot, and it behaves very poorly under such conditions. Hence the concrete reinforcements I was talking about - corners, edges and every 4.5 - 5 metres or so along wall length, plus points of increased vertical stress, such as a beam landing/support point, all tied into one monolith with above/below slabs. At first glance it looks like a concrete skeletal construction with bricks for filler, but it behaves quite differently - clay blocks ARE load-bearing elements, concrete "columns" are just for taking over horizontal stress.

We had our share of very devastating earthquakes throughout the region during the centuries, so the Building code is VERY strict regarding general structural stability....for example, light-frame construction is allowed for max ground +1 levels, masonry in general for max 3 above-ground levels, everything higher than that must have solid concrete as load-bearing structure. Up until recently, masonry was allowed for 4 levels with either ground level in concrete and rest in masonry with concrete reinforcements (as described above), or 4 levels of masonry (+ concrete "columns" as described) but all reinforced with steel bars running thru blocks vertically and horizontally between block courses....but the latest revision dropped both those options.

Clay blocks are in fact good for insulation (I'm talking about blocks with "holes" or air-pockets, such as this [link] , air is the best thermal insulator there is......actually it's vacuum, but we can't have that, right? :D ). Good thermal qualities, sound insulation as well - except for "impact" noise, such as vehicle noise, so the Code mandates solid blocks or even concrete for walls between living space and garages, plus clay is slightly porous and allows all excess moisture to safely "evaporate" through it.
....and it's not difficult to guide pipes and wires through them - if they *have* to be in clay-block-wall, surface is easily cut with power saws of even chipped with hammers, sufficiently deep to accommodate the pipes, and evened with inner plastering afterward, which is done anyway. Sewage pipes are somewhat of a problem because of larger diameter and are avoided in load-bearing wall of clay blocks if possible....but there are ways.

Rigid foam insulation comes on the outside....25cm perforated block + 10cm insulation, plastered on both sides, is enough to provide the Code-required level of thermal stability.
Insulation should come on the outside in general, regardless of structure type....when on the inside, its effect is quite diminished, plus the temperature drop gets you nasty moisture condensation between the insulation and whatever it's attached to, which is very harmful...

Phew :)
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2011
Great, thanks for explanations. That block is a little different than I thought, with the cells in it. But YES no sewage pipe, especially horizontal, without compromising the wall. Do you use an "R" value for insulation there? Are you familiar with AAC Hebel/Ytong block?
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:icondrugtito:
drugTito Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2011
We use the R-value, kinda.....:)
It's for Imperial units.....we use metric, so there are corresponding values to 'R'-s, in W/m2K

Yup, I'm familiar with AAC. In fact, we try to 'push' it to people, it has some very good qualities.....but with little avail, vast majority of them ends up going for derivatives of clay, especially when their own homes are in question. The explanation is usually in the vein of "It's natural".

The only instances where folks are willing to use AAC seem to be inner partition walls, rarely curtain walls in skeletal constructions, and most often on detached garages or similar things where no one will live in.

Beats me, really.....:hmm:
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2011
HMMMMM ingredients in it are just as natural as clay, breathes well, great insulator, blah blah. I like it because it's easy to work. You can shape it very easily. You could carve a Michelangelo's David out of it! With a router! Or a Dremel tool!!!
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