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Custom Res Rear Cross Sec Upper Gable 1-18 by Built4ever Custom Res Rear Cross Sec Upper Gable 1-18 by Built4ever
Another 3D model in progress for a home I'm designing. This type of 3D cross section uses real framing measurements to build a 3D model of rafters, 2x6 walls, etc., to check the interior clearance for a second floor room with a contoured ceiling. Very powerful software indeed. I can pull out the measurements of any component, such as exact rafter dimensions, and put them on a final plan. Now, the carpenter won't have to think any more, just assemble.
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:iconguardiannnangel:
guardiannnangel Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2014
After seeing the budget this is all I will be able to afford on my new construction. Just me standing on a n unfinished platform.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2014
Good ventilation though, air quality will be VG...
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:iconrealmwright:
Realmwright Featured By Owner Jun 27, 2014  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
I like that you've created a vaulted dormer design, but if the builder doesn't have to think about what he's doing you might run into a measure once, cut 4 times, aw crap we gotta buy more lumber scenario.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2014
This is actually a rearward facing gable, I just showed limited framing to get the point across. Hopefully, builders actually study the plans and build them as I draw them. Many don't. 
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:iconvonzott:
vonzott Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Professional Interface Designer
Wow!  An actual human!  Is this a first for you?
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014
HE HE HE I tried a cute lady but she looked like she belonged in a kitchen. If I start drawing people into my sketches I'll add too much time to the drawings. Now, I DO enjoy drawing a pin-up girl from time to time.
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:iconvonzott:
vonzott Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2014  Professional Interface Designer
Oh, that's RIGHT!  I'd forgotten your pin-ups.  Still, I don't think I've seen any humans in your architectural sketches ...
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jan 24, 2014
I would have to draw them about 2 millimeters high on some of these.
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:iconvonzott:
vonzott Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2014  Professional Interface Designer
( wow! )
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:iconjkrende:
jkrende Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Looks like Google sketchup?  is that right?
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2014
Yup. Getting faster and better at it quickly. I was a little clunky at first. Just wait til I build up an entire frame for a custom home I'm designing for a client! Then the young guys won't laugh at me!!!! He he...
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:iconjkrende:
jkrende Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
I have been using it for some time to design furniture for my woodworking.  Some of the complex curves and radii still confuse me with Sketchup, but the more you goof with it, the better you get.  :-D  I work on an oil rig and I've been recruited to draw up technical stuff several times to send to our Houston office to the engineers for evaluation and so far it's been an invaluable tool for seeing how something will REALLY fit together.  Forget Autocad!

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:iconf700es:
f700es Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Professional Artist
To be honest each have their own merits. As you noted SU cannot do curves, at all. It is all interpolated by more line segments. I look at each of my CAD programs  (SU, Acad, Revit) as tools for my tool belt. I use the correct tool for the needed purpose. ;)
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2014
I am totally with you on that brother! Ditch autocad. I was just telling SWEETIEPIE at dinner how you can do complex stuff like TOILETS with bizarre overlapping radius arcs and such. Yes! It's come to that!! Built4ever making 3D models of toilets! Glad to see you use it to model or design real world stuff. 
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:iconmikedoscher:
MikeDoscher Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2014  Professional General Artist
Thank you for sharing this. It would be phenomenal if physics simulations could be run against a model like this, and check against wind and snow loads and whatnot.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2014
Good call Mike. And that is exactly what I predict the next generation of architectural design software will do, is not only specify and catalog materials but also check engineering. For example, software could allow me to spec a piece on a drawing as a beam, and do the load calculations. Is the beam big enough for a certain floor load, or roof load? What about wind conditions? You would have to account for fasteners (type of nail or screw per X amount of inches, for example,) AND, very important, connection point and method at certain critical points, like beam to column. One of the worst aspects of modern American wood framing is the connection of important elements. Mortise and tenon timber frame joints are immensely strong, but no longer feasible economically.
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:iconmikedoscher:
MikeDoscher Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2014  Professional General Artist
I imagine certification and code compliance for software like that is going to be a big task! A new generation of mechanical connectors might smooth the way, maybe in conjunction with a wider use of engineered timber systems.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2014
Engineered and regular lumber is fine. Engineered beams are pretty much in general use now. Simpson ties (metal connectors) cheap and in general use. In california, they babysit the exact type of nailgun nail and the nail spacing to achieve earthquake compliance and create "sheer walls." Other obstacles include different laws in different states. Coastal Florida for example doesn't care about earthquakes but has strict new rules on hurricane tie-down systems running through the wall. Another "mechanical fastener!"  
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:iconkrynn:
Krynn Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2014
Revit is well on it's way to this, and AutoDesk has implemented specification checking in it's civil programs for transportation DOT requirements on minimum clearances, minimum curve radii, etc. It won't be long.
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