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February 25, 2011
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House 301 Storybook Cottage by Built4ever House 301 Storybook Cottage by Built4ever
A very compact design for a storybook cottage, an american housing style prevalent in the 1920's to 1930's.
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:iconlancelotprice:
Speaking of storybook style, have you ever seen Frank Lloyd Wright's Chauncey Williams house from the 1890's? I always loved that one. Incredibly steep roof slope, and very charming.

edit: I corrected the homeowner's name.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2014
Yeah, kinda bizarre, isn't it, because it's really storybook/prarie style.
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:iconlancelotprice:
LancelotPrice Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2014
He worked in several styles in his very early days, including even a Tudor or two.
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:iconmann-of-lamancha:
Mann-of-LaMancha Featured By Owner Edited Dec 14, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Probably something that is too detailed for you to indicate, but I used to go to people's houses in LI, NY and there were these brick walkway and front stoops leading up to the person's house, specifically in Plainview, that I think would really go well with this house or some house like it in the future. They were made in the late 1900's early 2000's that I can recall seeing, but the look was opulent without doing too much and yet also looked like they were a through back from a bygone era.

If the walk had a stoop, then the tread had either a bullnose or eased edge for the nosing, and the sides of the walkway were bordered with either a single stepped up brick, or a brick that was set at an angle, up and away from the path. In either regard, the affect was an easier way to keep dirt or puddles from the path.

I remember seeing some Victorian and Tudor era brickwork and while they didn't have bullnose edged bricks, there were times when they did some really intricate brickwork for chimneys and the like to add a richer look while simply using bricks.

Short of finding pictures of these walkways to the front doors in Plainview online, I might be able to make up a couple of 3D models of what these walkways looked like... if you are interested.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2014
Bullnose brick is hard to show at this scale, but yes, I like those. Special ordering bullnose would be expensive if you want to match the other brick. Victorian French and English were masters at polychrome and decorative brick, studies it years ago before I did design work...
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:iconmann-of-lamancha:
Mann-of-LaMancha Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
At the time, it just seemed that the patterns or ways they laid the bricks was more the innovation rather than costly special order bricks, that impressed me the most. I wish I had taken pictures at the time. Did I forget to mention it was all mortar-less pathways?

I've tried to replicate them with 3D modeling but there was some definitive difference that I can't seem to express properly.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2014
Yes, they DID do amazing stuff with reg'ler bricks. I also like nuances in colors, inset panels in slightly darker brick for example...
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:iconcrysa91:
Crysa91 Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Is the storybook look influenced by anything? I might be seeing things or over-thinking, but there appears to be elements of Tudor-era building technique as well as an almost Gothic method of internal space allocation. Not to mention the seemingly Netherlands inspired roof-line that becomes obvious through further inspection. But I could just be over analyzing things (stupid architectural history class).
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2013
hendricksarch.com/index.php/st… This is the original storybook home. It was built by a hollywood guy, maybe a set designer guy I think. It is similar to tudor, but more playful and eccentric. This home was published and had a major influence on small home design from 1926 up until WW2. Nothing particularly Gothic about the interior. Roof line is certainly reminiscent of Northern Europe, France, Netherlands, etc.
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:iconcrysa91:
Crysa91 Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I thought that the use of wide open space was of Gothic origin but it appears I was mistaken. Still it is interesting to learn the origin of such a common older building style.
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