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House 336, as built in Chicago by Built4ever House 336, as built in Chicago by Built4ever
Looks nice! Built by a developer as a "spec" house and just sold recently. Slightly modified from my original concept, but still looks nice. Love those huge planter boxes underneath the windows.
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:icontorukun1:
ToruKun1 Featured By Owner Jun 4, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
Your design is so much more charming and whimsical than the final version. :(
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2014
Pretty much everybody above said the same. Thanks!
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:icondarklord86:
darklord86 Featured By Owner Feb 7, 2014
Cool!
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:iconhusseinhorack:
HusseinHorack Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Your design is nicer, but it's still a very nice looking house. 
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014
Thanks Hussein....
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:iconclevella:
clevella Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2014  Professional General Artist
I mean this in the best way, but looking at your drawing, and then at the 'spec built' house, I can only say that we need more artisans, and fewer 'contractors' building homes. The actual house looks soulless and sterile, and the proportions that made the drawing so appealing were completely dispensed with.
Of course I live in a city full of Victorians in various stages of restoration, and so called 'renovation'. I grew up in the 'burbs', in a pre-fab concrete house that was assembled like a double wide trailer, so my appreciation for the artistry and aesthetic of what homes 'could' be like runs deep.
Your design work always inspires me, and I really wish there were people that knew how to build real homes, and not spec built, drab, out of the box disappointments. With each new home that goes in up the city, my disdain for 'contractors' continues to grow.
The exception is a former church, that is being restored to some semblance of its original glory.
I'll have to do some photo journalism while it still in progress.
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:iconjuliango:
JulianGo Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2013
Nice photo, but I actually prefer your design!
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Dec 23, 2013
I'm doing more stuff with this company, believe me, I have full creative control, so really good stuff is coming next year, keep watchin'...
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:icondicky-mint:
Dicky-Mint Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2013
A house like that in South Nottingham would cost the Earth!   It looks good even though it trimmed your original design.   :)
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2013
HMMM I believe around $400K. How much you think there? Hard to tell without knowing about the interior finish level... 
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:icondicky-mint:
Dicky-Mint Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2013
As a new build it would be well over 1M here. South Nottingham is expensive anyway.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2013
Yes, sounds like it. I wonder what the build quality would be though.
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:icondicky-mint:
Dicky-Mint Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2013
Some can be very good, but sadly most have their faults.
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:iconbrotherofmysister:
BrotherOfMySister Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2013   Digital Artist
I'm sticking with your original design. Beautiful work.
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:iconpscof42:
pscof42 Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2013  Professional Filmographer
I love the design. Shame they made it asymmetrical and changed the doorway and upper foyer window bay (though I do kinda like the little hayloft-y replacement window).
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2013
"Hayloft" he he this property was a farm a hundred yrs ago...
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:iconnebride7:
Nebride7 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
This is really beautiful!  Congrates on such a great design. :)
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 16, 2013
Thank you my dear, hope all is well...
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:iconjoekr9:
joekr9 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
Wonderful design.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2013
Thanks!
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:iconvonzott:
vonzott Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013  Professional Interface Designer
The photo looks sweet!  I like your design better (3 dormers, etc), but it's a pretty cool example!

Yay!
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
That's what everybody's sayin'  he he....
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:iconvonzott:
vonzott Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2013  Professional Interface Designer
(everybody's right...)
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:iconf700es:
f700es Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013  Professional Artist
Such a sweet design but as waste not seeing it in a wooded setting or on a hill side some where. I like your original design better ;)
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
Seems like the consensus!
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:icongnoll-el:
Gnoll-El Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
Your drawing is balanced, organic, and quite lovely; I can't say the same for the actual house which looks like it is trying to be something it isn't.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2013
Thanks...
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:iconslowdog294:
slowdog294 Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013  Professional General Artist
Simply adorable residence. :winner:
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2013
Thank you sir...
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:iconslowdog294:
slowdog294 Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2013  Professional General Artist
You are most welcome, my good fellow. :salute:
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:icondustercrow:
dustercrow Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013  Professional Artist
Nice, but they really sacrificed some of the vertical character with the windows they used.  They managed to take a lot of the charm & style away by making subtle substitutions that really altered the final feeling of the building.  I love seeing the before & after images!
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
Such is life as the builder, they make choices, sometimes for cost reasons or ease of building. The original sketch assumed high ceilings, so the windows were very tall and looked "more vertical."
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:iconspicercolor:
SpicerColor Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
I prefer your middle multiple windows, on all floors
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2013
Yes, my sketch assumed a 40' house width, but this is much narrower as built...
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:iconbidboroughstreet:
BidboroughStreet Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
NICE. I prefer your original design sketch, though. It's more balanced & convincingly antiquated.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2013
Thank you, seems to be the consensus above...
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:icongazdowna:
gazdowna Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013  Professional Artist
The pencil drawing is awfully cute and nicely executed, I admit, but the initial design is off proportions and has unrealistic, impossible to build elements, which in the end makes it naive design, (and quite honestly it's considered bad design, if it's not functional). Though that middle dormer in the finished building is just unnecessary.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
Everything is functional and beautiful, the only way to build! The original design assumed possible living space on the third floor. Ceiling shape would be fine and perfect for a bedroom or two, cozy and nice. Small dormers pose no structural issue at all, just double up rafters on either side, and build dormer walls on to the doubled rafters. I personally build, and can build anything on this house! Look in gallery and you'll see all kinds of interior and exterior components that I built. 
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:iconasleepalarmcall:
AsleepAlarmCall Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
I would like very much to know what are the elements that makes it "non functional", to be honest. I've already seen houses way more complex than this. More expensive than an usual one ? Yes, sure. But perfectly buildable. The house in the photo is just less elaborated.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
Correct. See my other comments below...
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:icongazdowna:
gazdowna Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013  Professional Artist
Oh, for example the tiny roof dormers up there, how big is the window? How wide is the construction supporting it? Unless it's glued to the roof it's really nonfunctional. Also the shape of the roof itself is something I never recommend- by the proportion of it and the angle, also by the fact that you have many planes added and the proportions of interior make me think that it will quite hard to place comfortably any room in without loosing a lot of floor due to low ceiling and the construction of the roof itself- unless it's steel beams, which are totally not cost effective in this kind of building. Finally- since I didn't see whole and in scale drawing of the floors I'm hesitant to have an opinion on it, but what I can see on your attached sketch that you are loosing quite a lot of place to fit long corridors. What for?
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
No steel necessary. We use laminated beams when necessary, LVL's we call 'em. Nobody glues a dormer to a roof except a model maker. Roof structure is not an issue, and interior volume is fine. Long corridors CAN have a place in some homes. You can also do a gallery of piers or columns, or arches, and leave it semi-open to the great room. The plan as built looks nothing like my original plan anyways. Sometimes I have traditional hallways, sometimes all open space planning, it just depends. When stairs come up to the second floor, you almost always need a short or long hallway to get past one bedroom to another. 
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:iconclockwerkmao:
ClockwerkMao Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
Since when do attics need high ceilings? Or great big dormers? Francois, how do you normally space a roof truss? These seem to be just fine with what I've seen of pre-industrial English dormers; of course those windows were built pane by pane, but I'm sure you can buy small operable windows.

I also have to ask: is this an example of differences between American and European design philosophy generally?
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
Well, I was letting everybody tear it apart and discuss!! But first, a few points: the attic is non-functional as living space. This particular builder usually stick builds, so usually no trusses in roof structure. That makes dormers and third floor windows "attic lights," not non-functional but not super important either. However, selling a house IS important and curb appeal is a huge selling factor in this subdivision. I personally HATE pre-fab trusses because they ruin the attic and they are often either out of spec or installed out of line with each other, creating drywall and trim problems. Also, they are spec'ed for flimsy "flex" numbers. I don't TRUSS them!! he he....
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:iconclockwerkmao:
ClockwerkMao Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
So what you're saying is that betting on the integrity of a truss is a gambrel?
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
Yes, that's right, truss me...
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:iconriverecho:
RiverEcho Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I would love to live in a house like this.  I always love your work and I wish I could just jump right in and live a nice life with wonderful buildings!
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 17, 2013
Well, make it a plan!
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:iconmred301:
MrEd301 Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2013  Professional Interface Designer
Beautiful!! I hope the builders quality was up to the quality of your design!
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Nov 15, 2013
He builds good stuff, all brick exteriors, etc. 
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