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Village Street by Built4ever Village Street by Built4ever
A mash-up of four houses from the "Unusual Homes" sketch page, arranged on an L-shaped village street, with proper perspective. Small and large houses look fine together, eh? I think I'll take number three. What about you?
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:iconlancelotprice:
LancelotPrice Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2012
Number one for me, I think, it's large enough and multileveled and labyrinthine enough to stay interesting for a long time.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 31, 2012
A challenging multi-level plan for sure...
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:iconlanoiree:
Lanoiree Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
I'll totally take 1.
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:iconkiiroikat:
KiiroiKat Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012   Digital Artist
I would love to live in the second house!
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:icondorshiffe:
Dorshiffe Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012  Student Digital Artist
It evokes me the houses in Fable :)
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:iconjonathanjturrell:
jonathanjturrell Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
I like 3 and 4 the best. Smaller. Remind me of old fashioned farm houses.
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:icondaretowatch:
DareToWatch Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012  Student General Artist
i'll take No 1
Nice sketches though.
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:iconkhyazel:
khyazel Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
I'd like number 4 very much... veeeeerry much. :love:
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:icondenzelajackson:
DenzelAJackson Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
so much has been done here with a small about of lines, good job
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:iconpocky-o-clock:
Pocky-o-clock Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012  Student Traditional Artist
Totally love the details 030 well done.
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:iconvonzott:
vonzott Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
#3 would be fun with a thatched roof, but does anybody in the US do them?
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
Negative, and here, it's a fire hazard. Almost no history of it. Early settlers typically used cedar shingles, in colonial period. "Fake" thatched roofs were done, however, in the 1920's for just a few of the storybook style homes, usually asphalt shingles "curved" around rounded eaves, etc. Not really convincing to me. I like ceramic tile and slate.
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:iconvonzott:
vonzott Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
I know of only one structure with An Actual Thatched Roof. It's in Rancho Santa Fe, California (RSF is the wealthiest zip code in the US), but I know nothing of where it came from or who did it. They're pretty to look at, but do kind of have problems with bugs and such. Yeah, tile is better, I think...
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
ABSOLUTELY against fire codes there! Not a good idea. Wealthy people sometimes go too far eh?
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:iconvonzott:
vonzott Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
At the time I found it, I worked for the fire dept. The Fire Marshall (who is no longer around) told me that the roof had been specially treated to be fire proof and that it was the only one in the US as far as he knew. I guess they brought someone over from, like, the UK or something. It's a fairly small structure, on the order of a 3-car garage or something, and I couldn't get close enough to do much more than sigh heavily. It's really pretty.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
Wow! They sprayed it with something! Yes, there are still trained thatchers in England! Good story! They ARE beautiful though, I love 'em too he he...
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:iconvonzott:
vonzott Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
Yeah. Sprayed or soaked. It's real thatch, but I can only *imagine* how expensive it was! Luckily, the homeowner could afford it. Or they wouldn't be living in that zip code!
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
Californica's codes are toughest in nation by far, no doubt...
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(1 Reply)
:iconmbnaveed:
MBNaveed Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012
Im all for number 4. Looks cozy. Also needless to say this is awesome.
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:iconthricelife:
thricelife Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Number 4 is my favourite too. Cozy and perfect for one or two people.
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:iconmbnaveed:
MBNaveed Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
And a few cats. Maybe some birds. And a sheepdog. o_0
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:iconthricelife:
thricelife Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I'd more likely go for a few Boston terriers and lots and lots of bookshelves :)
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:iconmbnaveed:
MBNaveed Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2012
Sounds awesome as well
Nothing beats the smell of old books
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:iconrandomsketchfactory:
randomsketchfactory Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012
Totally agree. Cozy and simple. Makes it easier to manage as well :)
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:iconmbnaveed:
MBNaveed Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
Indeed! ^_^
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
Less vacuuming.
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:iconmbnaveed:
MBNaveed Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
OR None at all ^_^ ok no lol
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
Better. Robot vacuum cleaners.
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:iconmbnaveed:
MBNaveed Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
Ah yesssss I was thinking of buying one of those
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:iconmred301:
MrEd301 Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
You must be an Architect, or if you're not, you should become one. Your designs are wonderful.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012
Yes, I have houses built and underway that I designed. My very best stuff hasn't been built yet. Patience!! Lifelong endeavour.
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:iconmred301:
MrEd301 Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
I am an Architect by profession, but not residential. You don't see houses designed to look like this very often. Very, very nice!
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
OHHHHHHH which firm? Lots of good commercial stuff goin' down in downtown G'ville. What do you think of the big one across from Trio's? Are you Clemson-trained? I actually interviewed with Don Gardner plan service about 2 yrs ago, right off Falls Park there. Nice Office!
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:iconmred301:
MrEd301 Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
I'm with Cor3Design, our office is in Riverplace, just upstairs from High Cotton and Michelin on Main.
I assume you're talking about One Main? I think it's gross, and totally out of context for downtown Greenville. But that's what happens when an out of town firm designs something for here.
I went to Miami University in Oxford, OH.
Don gardner is no longer in that location (and your work is way too good for what they do)
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
OHHHHHHHH yes very controversial, pushed back from the street, too large, glass and steel, blah blah. I was afraid it would ruin my favorite outdoor table, the third one from the front door at Trio's. Money always wins.

Gardner was stuggling at the time. Les wanted to hire me, but Don couldn't make the numbers work I think. They had been laying off half the staff in previous years! I think a revolution in plan service is coming. I have thought about this a lot. I could put together a plan that has 3d images, partial color, build options, trim options, 3d cutaways that show internal structure, complete framing solutions with all walls, rafters, joist plans, etc drawn out in plan and elevation form, provisions for vertical chases for services, built-in access panels at key points for maintenance, and more. What are you guys working on?
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:iconmred301:
MrEd301 Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
Yeah, I liked the site better when it was a vacant lot..

Lex is a good guy, I've known him for years, and when their office was downtown, we used to walk the river together. The economy has to improve for the residential market to start generating work.

I like what you're thinking for your drawings. It's very old school, but that's an artform that has been lost, just like manual drafting, sitting at a drawing board with a set of Rapidographs (ah, the good old days). I like to see 3D images for complicated details.
When I have done residential design, I always did a foundation, floor framing and truss/roof framing plan. I always tend to think in terms of how you build it and put it together, right from the start. I've seen so many designs that just can't be built the way it's drawn.

We have a 4 big box retail in Columbia just finishing, a revamp of the old Circuit City strip at Haywood Mall, a huge one at North Myrtle Beach, and a multiuse one in Kentucky.

Do you work for yourself or a firm?
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2012
I am self-employed. I like to say: "I'm self-deployed." Feast until 2008, rather famin-ish after. You know the drill. I also had my most important client die just before breaking ground. My very best house died with Dave. His life is worth a lot more than my design/career, of course. It was in NC, 2 million dollar home. It's in the gallery under proposed Glavin residence I believe. I also did design work on a house on Lake Lure, maybe 8 million? Craziest thing on the lake, French Chateau style. The plan was done by another firm, they were fired, and I was hired by the builder to do all kinds of changes and details like an 18 foot medieval retaining wall, elaborate chimneys, interior wood paneling and trusses, stone balustrade system with original design for the post (made in China!!!) blah blah. Great opportunity to get actual stone carvings done. Builder built it as I drew it. Came out very nice.

I've got several executed designs, including one here in Clairmont off Roper Mtn Rd., and some up here near me in Taylors. I also did a number of renovations, smaller stuff. Now, I DO the renovations. My skill set as a builder is much stronger each year that goes by.

I looked at your site, looks great, glad you have some work to stay busy. Hey! You did Brown Street!!! Lucky! We love that place. Pretty successful too.

Lex seemed like a good guy to work for. I'm sure they are hurting over there still.

I started to do a lot more investigation into structure, especially beam design, in the last year. I started doing calculations to determine loads, called out and numbered all the beams on many plans (B1-B26, for example,) And specified the beam as a GaPac LVL 2.0 16" depth, 20 feet long, etc. Also, figured out issues with ridge beams, and carrying loads through the house to the foundation. I'm also thinking about toilets, plumbing, pipes, electrical chases, light placement, HVAC design, etc while I do a floor plan. I have open livable attic spaces in all my designs, often with stairs up, and insulated rafters, so inexpensive trusses are a no-no for me. I use all the volume up in a house! I love heavy timber trusses. I've built 'em!

When I worked for someone at Lake Keowee for a while, right before I started designing, I learned firsthand about bad plans, unbuildable stuff, roof issues, confusing details, angled plans that create problems, etc. Architects should build! All architects should do hard time on the construction site, build wood crafts at home or furniture, renovate everything they can get their hands on. Two months on a framing crew will change how you do your plans!

Heh we could yack about this stuff forever!
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(1 Reply)
:iconmbnaveed:
MBNaveed Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
We were told at a recent lecture by a senior architect that you haven't learnt anything as an individual architect until you've been practicing for at least 30 years. That sort of made us all go WTF for a moment =P
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
I say almost the same thing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Unbeleivable. I also believe it's not all knowable, impossible to understand every aspect, even by 60 or 70 years old. You could spend several years just studying how to maximize the efficiency of heating and cooling systems by design practice, conduit layout, building shape, passive solar features, etc., til it gets so complicated, that is THE ONLY thing you are really designing for. Wait! I want my cottage back!! I want my steep gables and half-timbering back!!!!

Who was the architect??? Don't feel bad, I know you're younger than me. I look back on my first floor plans from circa 2006 and say "suitable for wiping my bottom with, MAYBE." They evolved hugely from year to year.
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:iconmbnaveed:
MBNaveed Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
I don't feel bad at all! It was just a pretty big wake up call for about 400 students from 5 architectural institutes. Very candid presentation by the fellow. His name is Shahid Abdullah, principal at Arshad Shahid Abdullah or ASA from Karachi, Pakistan. Simple, functional, BRILLIANT designs and a great personality to match. I get it though definitely, I've seen my father's designs change in the 15 years I've known the profession properly and he himself specialises in residences, with more of a focus on planning than anything. The most common thing I've heard clients say to him about the projects once they're done is "You've taught us how to turn a house into a home". And he's almost 60. So you know long LONG journey I guess.
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
When I meet with a client for the first time, I visit them at their present home, and see how they're living. Car magazines stacked on the dining room table? Laundry room the size of a shoebox for a family with 5 kids? This has nothing to do with your skill, ego,etc as an architectural designer. You are really like a psychologist, a detective, and a feng-shui practitioner all in one. "How can I improve their lives?"
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:iconmred301:
MrEd301 Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012  Professional Interface Designer
Amen to your last sentence there..
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
Yeah, you know the drill. But commercial stuff? Different routine eh?
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(1 Reply)
:iconmbnaveed:
MBNaveed Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
That's what my dad does as well. All the clients become friends for him. i'm slowly beginning to understand the idea of architecture...if only the process came with a steady sustainable pay cheque =P
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 20, 2012
NOT!!!
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(1 Reply)
:iconmalunon:
Malunon Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I think I'd take number 1 or two... Although they are all very nice designs :)
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012
Number two is a big one. I hope you have six or eight kids, and four pets.
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:iconsameh-koko2:
sameh-koko2 Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012   Digital Artist
nice :)
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2012
Thanks...
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