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December 23, 2012
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If you are working on a completely shaded drawing, or a finished art work, you may wish to follow the the ten per cent rule, which runs as follows: Make roughly ten per cent of your shaded areas black or near-black, and roughly ten percent white or near-white, with the rest of the artwork composed of a range of middle tones. This rule follows my deeper art philosophy that "beauty is in the middle tone." All areas of tonality must also follow the rule of balanced composition. I'm just formulating this rule now, but it seems that many high quality masterpieces, such as finished oil paintings and the best drawings, follow it to some extent. (not always, but many, I think.) For example, here's a typical masterpiece, a piece of art by Degas: penonpointe.files.wordpress.co… I think you can very clearly see the ten per cent rule in effect here.

The challenge is to my self (isn't it always?) to follow the rule and apply it to my best fully shaded art works. Since I rarely do anything that's fully shaded, let alone fully colored, this rule won't apply to most of the artworks I submit here, which are usually partially shaded sketches.

Additional news: I finished one of my bigger construction projects last week (see latest submission,) and another one is nearing the end and hopefully complete next week. I'll be working on the ground plan for "The Clove" town design next week over Christmas holiday as well, which should be very interesting, because I have to make all those cute little storefronts work together somehow, which will mean inevitable modifications and re-arrangements, but they final plan will be rewarding, I'm sure! Watch for that late next week, maybe a bit sooner.

Hope you all have a nice holiday season, wherever you are in the world. Thanks to all the new watchers this year, and, as always, I'm always happy to hear from everybody, respond to comments, and engage in verbal duels with whoever is up for the challenge! Don't be afraid to ask my advice, or even to give me a gentle critique (don't be to hard on me!) Yes, I do listen, I guarantee it.
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:iconpagodacomics:
PagodaComics Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2013  Student General Artist
Ooh, it's really interesting, I shall keep it in mind and experiment with it! :lol:
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2013
It's just a rough rule, but interesting to try use it...
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:iconeleven013:
Eleven013 Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
I think that The Ten Percent Rule could be very usefull..!

And btw, happy holidays ^^
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2012
Thanks, have a good new year's eve, yes, I'm trying to put it into practice slowly. I'll try to devise some more rules next year he he...Not that I actually FOLLOW rules...
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:iconeleven013:
Eleven013 Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Hah ^^ Aren't rules there to be broken? ;p
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013
Make the rule, memorize the rule, practice the rule, and, slowly, carefully, methodically, in just the right situation, you BREAK THE HELL OUT OF IT. Even Picasso was a classically trained expert draftsman in his youth.
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:iconeleven013:
Eleven013 Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes, the gret artists often start out by doing something ordinary for their time, and then they do something new - like Edward Munch :D
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:iconkurisiti:
Kurisiti Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
The name made me think of something one of my instructors said when I was in the CADD program, so, since you do architectural drafting, I thought you might me able to answer my question (becuase none of my instructors ever did answer it). What is the rule of thumb (or the rule of ten)?
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:iconbuilt4ever:
Built4ever Featured By Owner Dec 25, 2012
[link] Rule of Ten appears in at least two different fields, energy use at different biological levels, (simple to more complex plants, animals, etc,) and also as part of Six Sigma industrial/business/management philosophy. The professors don't explain it because it is difficult to explain. The link here shows fairly clearly how it works. As applied to CAD design, it has to do with resolution. How it actually works in practice, or what they were trying to tell you, is not clear to me because I don't ever really do CAD stuff, I had another architect draw my construction plans on the computer after I drew exact pencil drawings! It's a very good subject to study I think. See if you can comprehend the info on that web link I posted and apply it to what you were doing. Perhaps differences in scale between different components? I always do detail studies in larger scales of almost every component in an architectural design. It has something to do with resolution quality between different elements I think...
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:iconkurisiti:
Kurisiti Featured By Owner Dec 26, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
When the concept was first introduced to us, we were learning how to hand-draft (which did not go very well for my class since the instructor really couldn't tell us how to properly use the scales). After that the word pretty much kept popping up here and there--though no one dared to say more than, "follow the Rule of Ten". It makes sense that it would be applied to the scales since whenever to you do a detail of a portion of the floor plan, you have to blow it up (like from a 1/4" to a 1/8" or whatever).

I know that a lot of people prefer using electronics for drafting purposes, but I still think that its amazing that people can still make such detailed plans on paper (though I would hate to be the person who has to red line it). I loved the CAD program and wish that I could go back into it--its much better than having to listen to the dry lectures for Project Management!

*feels silly* I totally forgot that the Rule of Ten is applied to Six Sigma...XD

Thank you so much for taking the time to explain it to me and for link =) It just always bothered me when I was in the CAD program.
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